My Top 20 Favorite Short Stories

I’ve always maintained that if you really want to learn how to write fiction, you gotta start with short stories. You only have a couple of pages to grab a reader’s attention and establish the basics before your audience completely loses their patience and stops reading. It’s the first litmus test of whether or not you’re truly mastering your craft as a writer. If a particular writer has decent short stories, chances are you’ll eventually read their novel. 

My first writing experiences when I began writing at age 7 were short stories: fanciful little numbers that were inspired mostly by the 80s movies I grew up watching (“The Goonies,” “The Never Ending Story,” etc). Later on in my literature classes in school a whole new world was opened (Edgar Allan Poe, Hawthorne, etc) and they never left my heart. As a teacher I always used them in my instruction to engage students. Today I came across an article on Buzzfeed entitled “23 Short Stories You’ll Want to Read Over and Over Again” and some of my MAJOR faves got left out, so I made my own list. Enjoy!

Now some of these are already on Buzzfeed’s list, but because they’re my faves too, they’re listed again. In no particular order:

  1. “Thank You, Ma’am” – Langston Hughes
  2. “The Story of an Hour” – Kate Chopin
  3. “The Lottery” – Shirley Jackson
  4. “The Tell Tale Heart” – Edgar Allan Poe
  5. “All Summer in a Day” – Ray Bradbury
  6. “Patriotism” – Yukio Mishima
  7. “A Rose for Emily” – William Faulkner
  8. “Young Goodman Brown” – Nathaniel Hawthorne
  9. “The Necklace” – Guy de Maupaussant
  10. “The Cask of Amontillado” – Edgar Allan Poe
  11. “Sweat” – Zora Neale Hurston
  12. “The Life You Save May Be Your Own” – Flannery O’Connor
  13. “Raymond’s Run” – Toni Cade Bambara
  14. “Super Frog Saves Tokyo” – Haruki Murakami
  15. “Eyes of Zapata” – Sandra Cisneros
  16. “Everyday Use” – Alice Walker
  17. “The Pit and the Pendulum” – Edgar Allan Poe 
  18. “Wild Child” – T.C. Boyle
  19. “Cora, Unashamed” – Langston Hughes
  20. “Graveyard Shift” – Stephen King
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Review: Delicious Foods

   

Review for “Delicious Foods” by James Hannaham (2015)

Rating: 5 of 5 stars

[*deep breath*]

After I finished this book I lay awake staring at the ceiling for 30 minutes, thinking: if this book doesn’t win an award this year I don’t know what the hell people think good literature is.

I wasn’t sure what to expect with this book. I knew its main theme was the devastating effects of crack cocaine, but had no idea of what kind of ride this book would take me on. The first chapter completely jars you out of any sense of comfort with its brutality; the rest is deep, slow burn of emotion. This was not a quick read for me. It took a while to get used to the narration of “Scotty,” (a.k.a crack cocaine) but once I did I found myself reading and re-reading those chapters, just to experience the rhythm and hip-ness of the language once more, and to laugh (inappropriately, of course) at its narrative inclusion in this book. I kept waiting for Scotty’s narration to wane or sound ridiculous, but it never did. At times I had to pause and ask myself if it was really crack “talking” and not just another person in the book. Yes, it was THAT good.

I have to admit that the emotion of this book was, at times, too much for me to handle. Young Eddie is eleven years old when he discovers his mother is missing and begins to search, quite literally, through the depths of Hell to find her. My son is also eleven years old, and so many times in the book I found myself so overwhelmed with the image of my own child roaming the streets at night in my absence that I had to metaphorically take a deep breath and gather my bearings before I could continue. My feelings for Darlene and the choices she made throughout the novel alternated between full on rage and absolute pity, I was brought to tears too many times to count here. 

This book will break your heart. Very few books have the power to do this to me, I pride myself on having a heart and a stomach for just about anything. There wasn’t a single character that wasn’t real or a single word that’s wasted here. So well written, emotionally gripping. I loved every minute of this book. Highly recommended.

Review: Aquarium

Review for “Aquarium” by David Vann

Rating: 3.5 out of 5 stars

This book hits you like a punch to the gut. The words are beautiful, but man, when I finished, my head hurt.

I’m going to try to do this review without giving away TOO much of the book, so pardon me…

Caitlin is a twelve year old Seattle girl living with her single mother, a dockworker. Her mother can’t afford child care, so Caitlin spends each afternoon after school at the local aquarium. She meets an old man there and they become friends, bonding over their love of fish. It is later revealed that Caitlin and the old man share a connection that opens a deep wound in Caitlin’s mother’s psyche. She finds herself living in fear of her mother’s rage, as well as losing everything she loves in the process.

I will say this as well: a large part of this book was extremely disturbing to read. Caitlin is emotionally and physically battered in a way that, after pages upon of descriptions of this, I just wanted to scream “STOP! PLEASE! NO MORE!” I understood her mother’s rage, but felt it was a bit over the top, so much so that any connection of sympathy toward her mother at the end was impossible. Perhaps this was exactly the point though, how easy it is for one to take their cruelty out on another, especially upon those who are far more vulnerable.

I imagine this isn’t the book for everyone. While I enjoyed the color pictures and the descriptions of fish (I’m an aquarium keeper too) I don’t think I would want to read another page of this had it been any longer than it was.

Say hello to 29chapters.com!

How long has it been? A month? Maybe two?

As far as changes, I’ve recently purchased a nifty domain for this site, 29chapters.com. I had originally meant to do that from the inception but for some reason the action kept getting put on the bottom of my To Do list. Why 29chapters? Well, I was born on November 29th. And since this site is about books, why not? Phases in our lives are chapters, and books are a large part of my life. Brilliant!

I don’t know if I’ve ever told you already, but I’ll be starting on my doctorate full time this fall. I’ll be studying Curriculum and Instruction with a specific concentration in Literacy. My coursework will take at least 2 years, my dissertation will take another year beyond that. This program suits a person like me, who spent nine years as an English teacher in a middle school and now seeks to start a career in academia. The details took a while to pin down, but I can proudly say that I’ll be beginning my coursework in August. I’m excited, but I’m not sure how much time I’ll have left over after a busy day of class for pleasure reading. 

Fortunately, I have tons of book reviews I’ve already written in my Evernote account. If a cut and paste is necessary to get me through the dark days of no 29chapters.com for weeks at a time, I’ll do just that. 

Otherwise, I’m still here. The spring days are hor here, and I can’t wait to share my summer reading with you. I have a few reviews I’ll be posting over the next couple days. Stay posted!

Love, K

Review: An Untamed State



Review for “An Untamed State” by Roxane Gay

Rating: 4 out of 5 stars

This book really touched me. After finishing it I lay awake for several hours, just thinking about the raw reality of it over and over.. Very few books have the power to do that to me, and Roxane Gay is a sensational writer that captures your emotions with her first novel.

It goes without mentioning that this was not an easy read. It’s one of those books that you read for a while, take a breather, and, if you can stomach it, you dive in and take another plunge. I read this book in about four sittings, partly to get the suspense over with and partly to just end it–the terror, the waiting, the feeling like you are stuck in a cage and can’t breathe. You are fully there with Mirielle as she is kidnapped by armed men in on a visit to her native Port-au-Prince and held captive for thirteen days. What takes place over those thirteen days are some of the most terrifying experiences I’ve ever read. Mirielle is beaten, raped repeatedly, and tortured by her kidnappers after her wealthy father refuses to pay her ransom in some of the most cruelest ways imaginable. The disturbing content of this book could have easily allowed the author to venture down the “torture porn” route–lots of unnecessary, graphic details of violence, rape, and/or abuse that does nothing to develop character but only serves to shock an audience–but thankfully, Ms. Gay doesn’t go there. She does describe what happens to Mirielle in vivid detail at first but after that, manages to hint at specific incidents. I want to thank her for this, because without some kind of restraint on the part of the author I don’t think I would have been able to finish this book. 

Interspersed throughout Mirielle’s harrowing ordeal are flashbacks of Mirielle’s life with her family, her husband, and her career. At times the flashbacks were a wee bit long and unfocused, but, all in all, completely necessary for the story. Mirielle is a complex character, and the second half of the book deals with her life after the kidnapping. The writing here is a lot sharper, which I liked. Mirielle’s struggle to regain some semblance of normalcy is realistic and honest, and Gay doesn’t flinch from the jagged terrain of her recovery. Eventually one person is able to reach Mirielle, and it’s not who you expect. All in all, it added a very nice twist.

Roxane Gay dedicates his novel “to all women” and this dedication is fittingly appropriate, as this book lays bare the plight of women and their struggles. Not a pretty read, but a necessary one. Loved this!

Review: what purpose did i serve in your life



Review for “what purpose did i serve in your life” by Marie Calloway

Rating: No rating

I can’t unwrap my head around this one, other than to say that I wish I could unread this book. I wish I could delete it from my Kindle and act like the front cover and the title didn’t intrigue me to download it in the first place. But I can’t. Boo.

As a feminist I wanted to like this, as I’m always interested in feminism and sex-positive stories are always a plus for me. But there was none of that to be had here. This book is painful, twisted, and just…so…ugly. And it’s frustrating, because you can see Calloway’s point, buried somewhere in the muck of her detached realism and ridiculous online posturing. I don’t necessarily have a problem with her writing about casual sex with rapey losers she meets on the Internet, but why? Why is she doing this? She never really gives a context for anything, just a contrived, artsy, “I need to explore this” kind of attitude. It’s not even fulfilling sex, it’s cruel, painful sex with men she barely knows that humiliate and hurts her physically and make her feel subhuman. She clearly uses demeaning sexual encounters with less than stellar men to define her self-worth and cope with insecurities and past sexual abuse. She hints several times at having Daddy issues, but just as she gets to something interesting, the self dialogue stops and she abruptly stops the narrative. 

Her refusal to connect the dots between her emotional detachment and her sexual encounters seem to suggest that Calloway is merely interested in exposure of a prurient variety, i.e., pathological exhibitionism. In that vein, this book gives more than what you need. There are shots of Calloway nude, of her covered in bruises from a “bdsm” encounter, of her with a mouthful of semen, you get the picture. There is nothing inherently brave or noble she achieves in showing us this–it just makes her an attention whore, and an honest one at that. I want to send a memo to Miss Calloway that writing about sex in graphic terms (with photo proof to back it up) while being young and female isn’t provocative anymore, nor is it particularly interesting. At 200 pages, given the topic, this book still manages to drag, and some sections I skipped altogether. I wanted to put it down many times, and not because it shocked me, but because it bored the hell out of me.

This book did nothing for me at all. What would be shocking for me would be an emotionally healthy Marie, writing about sex in a way that reflected that mind state. But being normal doesn’t bring Internet fame these days, does it? Tsk, tsk…

Review: The Impossible Knife of Memory



Review for “The Impossible Knife of Memory” by Laurie Halse Anderson

Rating: 2 out of 5 stars

Not a terrible book, but a book that felt very wrong to me, especially as the spouse of a PTSD sufferer. 

My husband is a combat veteran. He served in the Air Force for almost 20 years, and in that time he served 4 tours overseas, including one in Kuwait (Desert Storm) and one in Iraq. I know about the nightmares, the alcohol, the depression, the silences, etc. I don’t have a problem with the author’s choice to talk about PTSD in a young adult novel, but the way she presents the narrative–through the eyes of an annoying and overly angry 17 year old girl–was completely disappointing. 

The characterization of the main character, Hayley, is at the heart of everything that’s wrong with this book. She is cold, close-minded, and judgmental of nearly EVERYBODY she comes into contact with. She hates everything and everyone–teachers, people in authority, girls, boys, kids at school she perceives to be better off than she is, school, life, her dad, her dad’s girlfriend. In her opinion, people are either “freaks” or “zombies” and there is no in between. I understand that Hayley has been through a lot with her dad and has a shitty attitude for that reason, but she was so over-the-top angry about everything and everyone that she was completely unrelatable and hard to sympathize with. She did have one female friend, Gracie, but throughout the book I wondered how they became or even how they stayed friends, given how hateful she was. Which brings me to another issue I had with this book…Hayley’s boyfriend Finn. I just didn’t get him at all. They have a very awkward romance and throughout the entire story she never really stops being bitchy towards him. He begs her to write for the school paper (which never materializes), follows her, won’t take no for an answer until he eventually just…stays. There’s no rhyme or reason to their relationship, or any discernible reason why he’s so intent on being with her. Although their courtship is somewhat cute, it just didn’t seem realistic to me.

Another underlying current I didn’t like was the fact that Hayley spends a large portion of the novel hating her dad’s girlfriend Trish for a reason that’s never fully explained or elaborated on. While it is revealed that she was a drunk who walked out on Hayley and her dad while he was overseas, the same flashbacks reveal her father to be an abusive, alcoholic shithead who put up his fair share of crap in the relationship too. So what if she left? I wanted to scream at this girl. She had every right to leave. At least she got rid of her drinking problem and thought enough about you to come back and try to make things right. No bueno though…it just comes off as yet more woman-hate spewed by a completely inept and poorly crafted character. 

This book was nearly 400 pages but should have been 200. Needless drama and angry brooding about a subject that got way too sanitized in the process. I loved Laurie Halse Anderson’s ‘Speak’, but this didn’t come close.